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Sábado, 13 / 07 / 19

7 Must-Read Fiction Books That Will Leave a Mark on Your Soul ~ Sherrie.

7 Must-Read Fiction Books That Will Leave a Mark on Your Soul.

By Sherrie.

July 13th, 2019

 
 
 
Reading is an important part of life, truly. There are many fiction books which are a must-read and are sure to impress you.
Despite the uprising of technology and ever-changing modifications of modern times, reading is still a timeless treasured activity.
I remember a time when reading books, you know, the ones you can actually hold in your hand, was the only way to read. So many of us can look back at a simpler time as this.
From then until now, I’ve encountered many must-read fiction books that remained with me throughout the years…touched my soul even. But there are others too.

The power of the right words that makes some fiction books a must-read

Thousands of words could leave no impression at all, just as one sentence could leave a deep indention upon one’s soul.
There are books to read for fun, non-fiction books to learn facts, then there is must-read fiction which proves to be some of the best books in existence.

Here’s where we take a close look at a few of them. Maybe you’ve read some of these yourself.

1. Hope for the Flowers, Trina Paulus, (1972)

To some, this story may seem like a children’s book, but at a closer look, you will notice the allegorical and rather mature meaning of the story.
Hope for the Flowers relays a tale of two caterpillars, as they ponder their destinies. One caterpillar assumes you must crawl and step on everyone else to get to the top and realize the best of life. The other caterpillar does what comes instinctual and builds a life which is rewarding.
Stripe, the caterpillar who has climbed a mountain of other caterpillars, finally reaches the top of the mound and only finds hundreds of other mounds of caterpillars, in the distance, doing the same thing. Yellow, the caterpillar who followed her instincts has built a cocoon and emerged as a beautiful butterfly.
The best part of this story is that yellow is willing to help Stripe remember his instincts. I think you will love this story and it will leave a warm feeling in your soul.

2. The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho, (1988)

First written in Portuguese, this must-read inspirational fiction book, became a bestseller worldwide. There’s a reason for such adoration.
The story is about a shepherd boy who decides to follow his destiny because of a dream he had while in an old church. A fortune teller suggests he follow his dream and travel to Egypt in search of treasure within the pyramids. As the boy travels, he encounters many obstacles and learns many lessons.
After meeting an alchemist, who teaches him how to know his true self, he is changed. When he is robbed, one of the thieves accidentally reveals a great revelation.
We learn from this story that sometimes what we need and desire the most is right where we are. Fruitless searching will take us right back to the beginning.

3. Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk, (1996)

You may have seen the movie, but you should read the book as well.
In this must-read fiction novel, an unnamed protagonist struggles with insomnia. He seeks help only to be told that insomnia isn’t really suffering. He seeks help in support groups instead.
Finally, he meets a man who would change his life by introducing him to underground fighting arenas. This environment, you might say, becomes his therapy.
This novel became so popular that a movie was adapted from the story, as I mentioned. It even has a following of young men who see the story as inspiration.

4. The Road, Cormac Maccarthy, (2005)

This story touched my soul in that it showed me the depths of human nature alongside the love and beauty of it as well. The story is set in a post-apocalyptic landscape where every living human being is out to survive at any cost. This means killing other humans and even more depraved acts.
The main protagonist and his son travel in hopes of finding long term sanctuary. The novel will rip your heart out at times but does end with a glimmer of hope.
Although the story may be hard to stomach at times, it will certainly leave you thinking about human nature for quite a while after reading.

5. The Story of Keesh, Jack London (1904)

We, as humans have trouble understanding things beyond our learned abilities. We may understand the strength and we may understand a certain level of magic, or say, “witchcraft”, as The Story of Keesh reminds us.
One thing that sometimes makes human beings struggle is the act of strategy. While some strategies are easy to understand, some are so simple, they go over our heads.
In the story of Keesh, the young 13-year-old Keesh teaches his tribe about using strategy to hunt, even to hunt animals which seem impossible to capture and kill. Keesh’s father before him was killed by a large bear, and yet, Keesh managed to kill many of them for his village.
Did he use strength? No! Did he use witchcraft, as the elders suggested? No, he did not. He simply created a trap which would kill the animal from the inside out.
This story leaves an impression on our souls and reminds us that there is so much power in the human mind and in determination. We don’t forget stories of this kind.

6. Sophie’s World, Jostein Gaarder, (1991)

Some people never really ask the important questions about life until they are older.
As for Sophie, she gets the opportunity to learn about philosophy as a teenager. After meeting Alberto Knox, her life changes forever. During the novel, she experiences an ability to utilize her imagination like never before.
After reading this book, you may learn a few new things yourself. And I promise, your soul will be left with an impression like no other.
The must-read fiction book became so popular that it was translated from its native Norwegian to 59 other languages. The book was also adapted into a film and video game too.

7. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee (1960)

It’s amazing just what we miss when we’re not paying attention. In this novel, Scout and her brother Jem are lost in the wiles of childhood. Meanwhile, their lawyer father, Atticus, is busy trying to win his most important case. A black man has been accused of raping a white woman, and Atticus must prove his innocence.
This novel will touch your soul as you read about the truth of Southern Alabama in the 60s. You will realize just how much we take for granted about human rights and freedom. While some of the historical language usages may be jarring, it’s a must-read.

Sometimes Fiction Can Change You

There are many self-help books and non-fiction journals that change the way we see the world and ourselves. There is also outstanding must-read fiction that changes us as much as other types of books.
I encourage you to explore fiction titles in your area. You never know when you might find a gem worth sharing with others.
Until we read from different lives, perspectives and even imaginative stories, we never really understand the full scope of the life we live. Our souls can only be touched by allowing the fullness of life to enter. So, go forth, read, read, read….and get to know yourself and the world like never before.
 
About the Author: Sherrie

Sherrie is a freelance writer and artist with over 10 years of experience. She spends most of her time giving life to the renegade thoughts. As the words erupt and form new life, she knows that she is yet again free from the nagging persistence of her muse. She is a mother of three and a lifetime fan of the thought-provoking and questionable aspects of the universe.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2019 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

 
 

 
Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 




No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 
 
 
 
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publicado por achama às 22:49
Segunda-feira, 08 / 07 / 19

What Plato’s Philosophy of Education Can Teach Us Today ~ Alexander

What Plato’s Philosophy of Education Can Teach Us Today.

By Alexander

https://www.learning-mind.com/

July 7th, 2019.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plato’s philosophy of education is a fascinating idea and one that Plato wanted to be implemented into Ancient Athenian society.
Scholars still study and discuss it today, but what’s interesting is how Plato’s theory of education has influenced many beliefs and principles that modern society holds. It is a model of education and culture that we have taken heed of in many ways, and that we can still learn much from today.
Yet, before we explore all this, it is useful to look at exactly what this theory is, and the structure of education in a society that Plato proposed.

What is Plato’s philosophy of education?

The philosophy of education according to Plato is a vast and detailed model of schooling for ancient Athens. It has many facets and aspects that could be discussed endlessly by scholars.
However, it has one simple goal, an idea that is congruent with Plato’s philosophy as a whole: for individuals and society to achieve the good, to reach a state of fulfilment or eudaimonia.
Plato believed we need education to learn how to live well. We should not just learn things like mathematics and science, but also how to be brave, rational and temperate. Individuals will then be able to live a fulfilled life and be better prepared for it. Furthermore, producing fulfilled and educated people would benefit society greatly.
He wanted to produce the best possible leaders so that society can flourish, and itself be geared towards the good. He proposed this through training individuals to become what he calls ‘guardians’ – individuals best suited to govern society (more commonly known as ‘philosopher kings’).
So, Plato wants individual fulfilment and improvement of society through his model of education. Both are a means of working toward a state of eudaimonia. But how does he propose to achieve this?
A good starting point is to recognise that Plato’s ideas are influenced in part by Sparta’s education system. It was state-controlled and Plato wanted Athens’ system to be state-controlled as well. Sparta was a society that focused its efforts to produce warriors to serve the state through rigorous physical education.
Plato admired this model but believed it was lacking literacy. He wanted to engage both the body and the mind through education.

The curriculum

A curriculum is suggested for this theory of education. This curriculum starts with very small children and can extend up until the age of 50 for some individuals. It is separated into two different sections: Elementary education and Higher education.

Elementary

Plato in his academy, drawing after a painting by Swedish painter Carl Johan Wahlbom
Plato in his academy, drawing after a painting by Swedish painter Carl Johan Wahlbom
Elementary education lasts up until the age of 20. Firstly, children should predominately have physical education. This should be the case up until the age of about 10 and is to ensure children are at peak bodily health for fitness and also to better fight illness and disease.
Then children should be introduced to art, literature and music, as Plato believed that these subjects would cultivate their character.
Art would act as a means to teach morality and virtue. More practical subjects were taught at the same time as this to give a balance of subject matter. These include mathematics, history and science for example.
Elementary education is an important time for a person’s development. This education should not be forced as this could restrict and mould a person a certain way that does not represent their character.
Children should be left so that their natural skills, qualities and interests can flourish without influence. This can give an indication of what occupation they would be best suited to in the future, and what sort of character they may become.

Higher Education

The next stage in the curriculum is higher education. An individual must take an examination at about the age of 20 to decide whether or not they should seek higher education.
One would then learn more advanced subjects like astronomy and geometry for the next 10 years until another test is taken. This will determine whether or not to progress into further learning, similar to the first test.
People still in education would constantly be learning new and more advanced subjects and are tested along the way. Those who fail to meet the standards at each test must drop out. This carries on until the age of about 50.
You are deemed successful, competent and measured enough take upon the most important task if you reach this stage. These people are allocated as the ‘guardians’ of the state. They are best suited to govern and uphold a just and moral society. They are the ‘philosopher kings’.
This curriculum shows Plato’s theory on how we should be educated in the right way in order to bring about the good in society.
Those who drop out at a certain stage will find other trades, jobs or crafts that best suit their skills. But they will still have attained an education that will help them to bring about a positive impact on society, and to help them reach a state of fulfilment.
Those who are guardians should strive to implement these ideas on a much larger scale for the good of the state.
Plato did put his philosophy of education into practice by setting up his own school: The Academy.

The Academy

The ancient Greek philosopher set up what is said to be the first ever institute of higher education. It was similar to what we would now recognise as a university. The Academy was an educational establishment set up by Plato to try and implement his vision of education in society.
Its purpose was to teach us how to live well, and to produce rulers for society. Nowadays it is seen depicted in art and often seen as a symbol for classical philosophy.
plato's philosophy lessons
Plato and Aristotle in “The School of Athens“, painting by Raphael
However, it was fundamentally a school organised to teach Plato’s philosophy. People would be taught all manner of subjects and be filtered out to find the most competent and worthy of managing a just and virtuous city-state.
We have now explored what Plato’s ideas were and how they were practically implemented in society. But what does it all mean? Why did Plato urge for education to be this way?

The theory explained

Plato’s philosophy of education strives to achieve all that Plato is concerned with: a functioning just state and eudaimonia. He believes education should be structured in a way so that it provides people and society the positive measures needed to flourish.
People will be better equipped to reach a state of fulfilment, and society will be better equipped to be the ideal, just state. Plato’s philosophy of education promotes and works towards the common and final good for everybody.
Some people will not make it through every stage of this structure of education, but this doesn’t matter. If someone does not make it past a certain stage, then it is an indication that they are best suited in a certain role in society. They can now direct their skills and efforts to fulfil this role and ultimately work towards a fulfilled life.
Those who become guardians of the state after progressing through each stage of education are effectively philosophers. They will be the wisest in society, the most rational and the most temperate.
Plato wanted to rid society of the current political leaders and replace them with those best suited to govern a just state, whilst being concerned for the common good for everyone. Only philosophers can do this in Plato’s eyes.

Why is Plato’s philosophy of education relevant to modern society?

modern education system
Plato’s ideas are relevant today because of his vision of an education that is inclusive of everyone, and its importance in creating a just and moral state. These are ideas that have recognisably influenced our society today, and there is much we can still learn from them as well.
The system of education is based on everyone having access to the same education. Its very basis is the equality of individuals.
It allows people to naturally flourish whilst also guiding them into a life that will produce a positive impact on society and hopefully guiding them to reach a state of fulfilment. It suggests everyone has liberty – this aspect arguably laid the groundwork for modern democracy.
Perhaps what we can learn more than anything from Plato’s philosophy of education is the overall intention of it; ensuring that society functions well in a just and moral way and that people live well and achieve the good life.
It is the duty of educators to implement this and to have profound care and concern for a learner’s wellbeing, and not just the knowledge they wish to instil.
It is also the guardians’ purpose to have profound care and concern for everyone in society. All of this is a guidance for people to reach a state of fulfilment, Plato’s ultimate goal.

Modern education and Plato’s philosophy

I don’t expect our political leaders to be replaced with trained philosophers and become the rulers of society any time soon, but the premise behind these ideas are important.
Modern education does a good job of preparing us for work and to be self-sustaining in the world. But we are ill prepared to face many inevitable difficulties in life. This causes us much struggle and suffering, often without much guidance as to how to deal with it. We all yearn for this guidance in dark times.
Education should be this guidance. We should learn how to live well and how to deal with suffering so we are prepared for much more than just work, so we can too become fulfilled individuals. Plato’s philosophy of education is a call for this, and we should listen to him.
References:
  1. https://plato.stanford.edu
  2. https://epublications.marquette.edu
  3. https://www.biography.com
  4. Featured image: Painting of a scene from Plato’s Symposium (Anselm Feuerbach, 1873)

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2019 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

About the Author: Alexander


I am an English and Philosophy graduate and freelance writer and blogger. I have always been fascinated by art, culture and philosophy, and believe they are an integral and important part of all of our lives. My particular interests and passions include Film and ancient Greek philosophy.
 
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 



No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


More @ http://violetflame.biz.ly and 
https://rayviolet.blogspot.com/




 

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publicado por achama às 06:22
Terça-feira, 25 / 06 / 19

How to Practice Modern Stoicism and Why It Will Make You Happier ~ Janey Davies.

How to Practice Modern Stoicism and Why It Will Make You Happier.

By Janey Davies.

June 25th, 2019.

 
 

 



 

Just one glance at the internet and you’ll be deluged with posts promising to reveal the secrets of everlasting happiness. But actually, there is no mystery to being happy, and modern stoicism can show you why.
The word stoic suggests a longsuffering, patient, tolerant person that bears their burden without complaint. However, to imply that this is the route to happiness would be completely wrong. The theory behind modern stoicism is simple.

What Is Modern Stoicism?

In life, we cannot control everything so we should focus on the things we can and accept what we cannot change.
Modern stoicism originates from the Stoics who were ancient philosophers living in Greece. These wise men argued that in order to live happier lives we should decide what things we can change and what we cannot.
Once we have distinguished between the two, we can work at changing what is within our power to do so. Then it is easier to accept what we cannot change as part of life. This might sound like airy-fairy nonsense, but it does make a lot of sense when you consider what is actually under our control.
What can’t we control?
  • What people think of us.
  • Our own bodies.
  • The environment
  • What people do.
What can we control?
  • How we think about all of the above.
  • What judgments we make about those thoughts.

There are two basic principles:

We can’t control everything in life. All we can control is how we think about what happens and the judgments we make, based on these thoughts. And this is where it gets interesting. The ancient Greeks believed that it is not actual things that cause us unhappiness but how we think about them.
When something happens, we make a judgment about it. If we think the thing is bad, we feel upset or angry or grief. It all depends on what the thing is, on how we have perceived and judged it. However, this same thing might not upset another person, indeed, it might even be a joyous event for someone else.
For example, take a World Cup final. The winning team’s fans will be rejoicing. The losers will feel real pain and grief. If you’re not interested in football, you won’t be affected at all.
So, the important thing to remember is that whatever judgment we add to our thoughts gives the thing value. Moreover, it is this value that produces our emotion. The good thing is that we have control over these judgments. Whatever happens, whether it is good or bad, we can decide what value we assign to them. That value will then affect our emotions.
Likewise, this emotion can be happiness or sadness or anything we choose to feel. So while we may have no control over what happens to us, we do have complete control over how we feel about what happens to us. Consequently, we are in control of our happiness.

So how does stoicism work in the modern world?

 

Figure out what’s really important

 
Many people lust after wealth, fame, power, status, but the reality is that few of us are going to attain these things. As a result, a lot of us are going to end up miserable because we haven’t achieved these goals. So why do we value these things? At the end of the day, most of us just want to be comfortable, healthy, have good friends and no stresses or worries.
Consider why you want these meaningless trappings? Is it to impress other people? Perhaps the media tells you that in order to be happy, you have to have the fastest car, the nicest watch, the latest designer dress. Do what makes you happy, not what others tell you.

It’s not about self-belief or positive thinking

 
Consider this scenario; you’ve decided to scale Mount Everest. You’re setting off with no strategy, equipment, guides and you’re unfit. Now, no amount of self-belief or positive thinking is going to get you to the top of that mountain. Modern stoicism is about setting realistic goals that are right for you and that are achievable.
You hear a lot of stories of successful business people where determination and positive thinking was the key to their success. They never gave up and it was their dogged self-belief that spurred them on. But when you consider that 9 out of 10 start-ups fail, it’s obviously not about believing in yourself. It’s about getting the right idea in the first place.

Distinguish whether the situation is under your control or not

 
If something is starting to bother you, try and distinguish whether it is one of those things that’s under your control or not. Think about this as a line that divides the actions of anything that’s out of your control on one side, and your thoughts about those actions on the other side. Then whatever is bothering you, place it either side of the line. Now, you’ve distinguished which one it is, is there anything you can do about it?
For example, a shop assistant is rude to you in the store. You immediately feel angry, but you can’t control the assistant’s actions. Perhaps they are busy and under stress? What you can dois complain about their behaviour to their manager, or you can ask them to explain their rude behaviour.
By dividing what you can control and can’t takes the pressure off you. It removes emotion from situations. It’s actually very freeing. It’s not about letting people off the hook for being rude or aggressive, it’s more about living your life without the pressure of feeling responsible for everything that happens in the world.
My final point is that if you want to start practising modern stoicism, every morning, think about the day ahead, the possible traps you might encounter. Just be ready for them and remember that you can’t control everything, but you can control how you feel about things.
 
References:
  1. http://www.bbc.com
  2. https://www.independent.co.uk
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

About the Author: Janey Davies.

Janey Davies has been published online for over 8 years. She is the head writer for Shoppersbase.com, she also writes for AvecAgnes.co.uk, Ewawigs.com and has contributed to inside3DP.com. She has an Honours Degree in Psychology and her passions include learning about the mind, popular science and politics. When she is relaxing she likes to walk her dog, read science fiction and listen to Muse.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 
 
 



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Discernment is recommended.

 

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No religious or political belief is defended here. (Investigate yourself)

 

Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 

If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 21:12
Quinta-feira, 13 / 06 / 19

7 Profound Lessons Eastern Philosophy Teaches Us about Life ~ Alexander

7 Profound Lessons Eastern Philosophy Teaches Us about Life.

By Alexander

https://www.learning-mind.com/

June 12th, 2019.

 
 

 

Eastern philosophy does not differ from other philosophic teachings in its overall objective. This is to teach us to be wiser individuals and to ultimately provide guidance as to how to live well.
Therefore, Eastern philosophy is no different from Western philosophy is this sense. The distinction lies in how it suggests we can achieve these goals.
You may study the likes of PlatoAristotle, Descartes, Hume or Nietzsche to name a few across various academic disciplines. The teachings of such abide by the central doctrine of western philosophy. It’s about using reason and logic as a means to analyse, understand and think more deeply about our lives. But it can be useful to gain a different perspective to find the answers and guidance in life that we quietly yearn for.
Eastern philosophy places focus on the individual or the self and the individual’s role in society. It explores how to reach inner peace and our relationship with nature and the wider cosmos.
There are many branches of eastern philosophy. But as a whole, it asserts and presents general and useful ideas to us about how to live a good life on the basis of these themes.
These simple ideas have the potential to enlighten and enrich us when we grapple with some of the biggest questions in life that so often seem so elusive.

Here are 7 life lessons learned from eastern philosophy that are still relevant and useful to us today:

Life is full of pain and suffering

This Buddhist sentiment can seem incredibly bleak and dismal and you would only be sane if you were to have this reaction on first being told this. Yet, after a time, such a thought can begin to seem strangely paradoxically comforting to us.
Our lives are full of constant and reoccurring pain, worry and anxiety whether we wish to admit it or not. We may attempt to push away or forget about this fact by seeking happiness in material things. This is especially common in a modern, commercialised media-driven age.
However, not recognising and failing to face up to this fact can inadvertently heighten our sufferings. As a result, we become increasingly unequipped to deal with them.
The sooner we begin to realise this fact, the sooner we will be more prepared to deal with and understand the reality we have. Begin to comprehend the suffering that you are facing currently and the suffering you will inevitably face and you will become more content with your life.
This will allow you to truly appreciate the periods and moments of joy. It will also bring you important comfort in an all too difficult and arduous life. Finally, you will feel the contentment we all deeply ache to achieve.

Be humane

Confucianism teaches the importance to be humane to one another. We are all enduring the same existence. Everyone else has probably had their heart broken, been grief-stricken or been betrayed at some point down the line. We should be conscious of this fact.
Showing compassion to one another will enable us to partially alleviate the pain of our fellow human beings. This can also help us to maintain a moral character. Often, this doesn’t have to be more than a passing comment to both those we love and those we feel inclined to despise.
Confucius ultimately believed that being humane to one another is crucial for individual morality but also for an ethical society. The thought is that if individuals are ethical to one another, then this will provide a foundation for a moral society.

Let things happen

spiritual beliefs science
When things don’t go our way in life, we can frustratingly try to make things happen. We may also try to stop things from happening. Our attempts to try and force this could prove futile and create unnecessary harm in the process. Rather than trying to change or prevent inevitabilities, sometimes it is better to just ride the wave.
These ideas are prominent in Taoism and places emphasis on essentially letting nature run its course. The ancient Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu believed in the importance of being in harmony with nature and the universe. This is an important trope of eastern philosophy.
We should accept our place in the cosmos and stop resisting the inevitable forces that come our way. Only then can we hope to reach a state of calm.
True fulfilment comes with accepting what is natural and inevitable. So just let things happen.

Life is a state of continuous change

Our lives are always changing in many different ways. We become older, we lose friends and family, we may be offered a job, we may lose a job, our relationships will end and new ones will begin.
Knowing that the past is unalterable and being aware that our lives will head off into differing directions can cause us distress.  We may regret our past actions or lament opportunities that we didn’t capitalise on.
Rather than despairing on these matters, we should perhaps gain a different perspective on them. Yes, our lives will scarily and quickly change and moments will pass. But this means our suffering and pain is also impermanent.
Just as the trees around us grow, the plants die and landscapes change, our lives are also constantly altering. We will still bemoan the good that is now in the past. But this change can mark the passing of dark times in our lives allowing us the space to rebuild and prepare for a more prosperous future.

The self is a state of continuous change

It is useful to realise that ‘the self’ is always altering just like life always is. We are often pressured to believe that we must ‘discover who we are’ or have other similar idioms inflicted on us in modern society. But facets of our individual selves can constantly change.
Our dream job can be something of continual development and discovery. The vision of our ideal partner can be subject to frequent amendments. Finally, our political convictions may change over time.
Sticking rigidly to self-imposed or socially imposed constraints can cause us frustration and distress. This happens when we know they will not ultimately provide us with the fulfilment we crave.
Don’t be afraid to embrace your changing ideas, convictions or beliefs. It is a sign that your individual self is constantly developing. It should be exciting to explore such changes and should provide you with the freedom to find true fulfilment in what you choose to do.

Always move forward

Signs You Have Found Your Path in Life
Confucius reminds us of the importance of ensuring that we are always moving forward. If you are dealing with a setback in your life or if you are struggling to achieve a goal, it is important to keep on moving in the right direction, however small the steps may be.
Perhaps you have been rejected for several jobs, feel unsatisfied with your personal life or feel stagnated as a result of a job that you are in. It is important not to feel as if you are retreating away from what you think will ultimately fulfil you.
If you appear to reach an impasse then actively change something about your life, however minimal or drastic. Sometimes making a change is what is necessary for your own well being; to ensure you are moving in the right direction towards fulfilment – whatever this may entail.

Gain strength from your suffering

As the Buddha said, and as we have already discussed about eastern philosophy, life is full of pain and suffering. There may be several moments in our existence when we may feel as if we are coming apart at the seams.
It is one of the most important facts about our lives that we should be aware of. But being aware of this fact is only part of the way we should deal with it.
We should not try to forget, disguise or quell our sufferings or failings. Instead, we should recognise, accept and learn from them. As a result, we will be better prepared in the future to rebuild our lives if we need to when they become inexplicably broken or damaged.
We are all deeply lonely and fractured beings. We are all struggling in some way or another, but we can all be healed and repaired. It is important not to fall into bitterness or angerabout what has happened to us or neglect the reality of our difficulties. This will only leave our wounds open and intensify the suffering we feel.
If you are resentful over a painful event or a betrayal then you will, of course, for a time, be in despair. Yet, despite our anger as a result of these events, or our deeply held convictions to those who have wronged us, we should accept, learn from the experience and learn to forgivehowever hard it may be.
Perhaps then we will be able to stitch our lives back up with stronger seams than before.

Why is eastern philosophy relevant to us?

buddha eastern philosophy
Eastern philosophy is relevant to us because it speaks of the fundamental truths in our lives that we would perhaps struggle to conceive of or even want to avoid. Yet, it can gently remind us and teach us of these facets of our existence in a reassuring and comforting way.
The issues that troubled eastern philosophers and the people of their time were very much the same issues that we are grappling with now. We are all suffering the same, facing the same frustrations and are all faced with difficult decisions.
Eastern philosophy helps to calmly and serenely ease our anxieties to help us get through these things through soothing imagery, poetic words and encouraging us to simply let ourselves run our course with nature.
It is an attractive alternative to western philosophy if we ever pine for a little bit of calm amongst the chaos of our lives.
References:
  1. https://plato.stanford.edu
  2. https://www.ancient.eu

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2019 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

About the Author: Alexander



I am an English and Philosophy graduate and freelance writer and blogger. I have always been fascinated by art, culture and philosophy, and believe they are an integral and important part of all of our lives. My particular interests and passions include Film and ancient Greek philosophy.
 
 



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publicado por achama às 02:49
Quinta-feira, 06 / 06 / 19

10 Philosophical Quotes about Life That Reveal the Truths We Often Neglect ~ Francesca F.

10 Philosophical Quotes about Life That Reveal the Truths We Often Neglect.

By Francesca F.

June 4th, 2019

 

 

 
It is all too easy to focus on the wrong things, but these philosophical quotes will remind you of what is truly important in life.
 
Philosophy offers a lot to the world. More than anything, it gives us insights into what is really important in life. Work, money and other responsibilities distract us from the bigger picture, making us forget to take a moment to enjoy life.
 
These philosophical quotes will help you to remember all of the good things life has to offer and remember to look at the bigger picture.
 
 
“The more a man meditates upon good thoughts, the better will be his world and the world at large” – Confucius
 
 
 
Positivity is a powerful force. It can be hard to focus on good thoughts but there is a strength in being grateful for what we have.
 
The more we focus on the good things in our lives, the happier we become. We then radiate that happiness and positivity to those around us. The more people focussing on positivity, the more positive the world will be as a whole.
 
It’s not true that one person can’t make a difference. You may inspire others to focus on positivity and they, in turn, will inspire those around them.
 
 
“The secret of happiness, you see is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less” – Socrates
 
 
 
They say that money can’t buy happiness and they are not wrong. We constantly think that the more we have, the happier we will be. The truth is, we need to be grateful for what we have.
 
There is someone out there who is happy with less than what you have. We are lucky to be where we are, and we should take the time to be grateful for the things we do have. We are not unhappy because we do not have more, but because we do not appreciate what we do have.
 
 
“If you are depressed, you are living in the past, if you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present” – Lao Tzu
 
 
 
We naturally worry about future commitments and upset about things in the past. Future commitments can make us anxious and the past can be painful. However, when we focus too much on these things, we stop focussing on what is happening in the present.
 
When we focus on what is happening right now, we can let go of our past, even if only temporarily. By focussing on right now, we can do what is necessary to meet our future obligations. By focussing on the present, we can ourselves peace of mind.
 
 
“Life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced” – Soren Kierkegaard
 
 
 
Sometimes our default is to be in survival mode and this means we constantly look for the next problem to solve. This, however, takes away from what life has to offer, and this quote on our list of philosophical sayings is a powerful reminder.
 
 
Life is full of opportunities to stop, take a breath, and just experience what is in front of you. Try allowing yourself to slow down, take a breath, and experience all that life has to offer.
 
 
“No amount of anxiety makes any difference to anything that is going to happen” – Alan Watts
 
 
 
Sometimes things are just out of our control. That doesn’t mean they aren’t scary or anxiety-inducing. Although it’s natural to be stressed about that which we can’t change, we can’t let that stress become all-encompassing. If you cannot change a situation, do not allow it to consume you.
 
 
“Prejudices are what fools use for a reason” – Francois Voltaire
 
 
 
The world has become full of prejudices, but prejudices can be dangerous. Not only can they be used to sway our opinions, but they also close our minds to new experiences. True knowledge comes from recognizing your prejudices and educating yourself.
 
 
“If you hate a person, then you are defeated by them” – Confucius
 
 
 
Hate takes a lot more energy than letting something go. If you spend time feeling angry at someone, you spend time actively thinking about them. This takes away from time you can spend doing other things.
 
When you’re losing time and energy hating a person, you are always losing. Let your grudges go and be the bigger person.
 
 
“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it” – Aristotle
 
 
 
Education opens the mind to a whole new world of experiences, thoughts, and opinions. An important part of the process is listening to the opinions of others and discussing them. Other people will open your mind and teach you things you may not expect.
 
 
“It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop” – Confucius
 
 
 
Determination is an important part of achieving any goal, but setbacks will happen. It’s important not to let them get to you. Don’t give up on your goals, no matter how difficult they feel.
 
 
“The madness of love is the greatest of heaven’s blessings” – Plato
 
 
 
Love is the most incredible experience life has to offer. Despite being messy and complicated, love brings us so much joy. Don’t be afraid of the complications. Love is one of the greatest blessings life can give, as stated by one of the most well-known philosophical quotes.
 
There are so many philosophical quotes about life that can give us the insights we need. We may not realize we need them, but it can make us realize what is truly important.

 

 

  1.  

 

 

 

 

About the Author: Francesca F.

Francesca is a freelance writer currently studying a degree in Law and Philosophy. She has written for several blogs in a range of subjects across Lifestyle, Relationships and Health and Fitness. Her main pursuits are learning new innovative ways of keeping fit and healthy, as well as broadening her knowledge in as many areas as possible in order to achieve success.
 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

 
Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
 
 

 
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No religious or political belief is defended here. (Investigate yourself)

 

Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 

If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 09:03
Sábado, 25 / 05 / 19

8 Important Plato Quotes and What We Can Learn from Them Today ~ Alexander

8 Important Plato Quotes and What We Can Learn from Them Today.

By Alexander

https://www.learning-mind.com/

May 25th, 2019.

 
 

 

The following Plato Quotes are profound, important and representative of his philosophy as a whole. However, before we examine these quotes, let’s take a look at who Plato was and what his philosophy amounts to.

Who Was Plato?

Plato (428/427 BC or 424/424 – 348/347BC) was born and died in Ancient Greece. He is one of the most famous and influential philosophers in the western world, and is, along with Socrates, responsible for building the foundations of philosophy as we know it today.
His works are vast, entertaining, interesting but also very complex in some parts. Yet, they are profoundly important and relevant to us still because of the core aim in all of his writings: how to reach a state of eudaimonia or the good life.
This means reaching a state of or attaining fulfilment. He concerned much of his life to helping us to achieve this. This idea is representative of what philosophy has been over the last two millennia and still is now: a means to help us live well.
The form that his writings take is significant and interesting and makes his ideas and teachings much more vivid and engaging. But what form of writing is this?

Plato’s Dialogues

All of his works are dialogues and are always set out as a conversation between characters. Most of the time, we see Socrates having a conversationwith counterparts as they discuss all manner of things.
These dialogues cover many subjects such as politics, love, courage, wisdom, rhetoric, reality and much more. However, they are all concerning themselves with the same thing: working towards an understanding of the good.
Plato was a follower of Socrates, and much of Plato’s own thoughts are probably expressed through the character of Socrates in his dialogues.
The conversations are a demonstration of elenchus or The Socratic Method, whereby Socrates elicits the truth through a series of questions and answers with the other characters in the dialogue. These conversations can also be entertaining; as well as discussing deeply important and relevant issues about life and society.
Yet, if you don’t want to read whole dialogues, there are certain quotes by Plato that shed light on his main ideas. Moreover, they can prove to be important and helpful when analysing and questioning our own lives.

8 important and interesting Plato quotes that are helpful and relevant to us today

Plato’s dialogues eloquently provide us with theories and ideas about ultimately how to improve society and ourselves so we can become fulfilled beings. They demonstrate the need for reason and analysis in our lives; only then can we truly reach the good life.
These dialogues showcase this clearly as a whole, however, there are certain quotes that give succinct insight into Plato’s ideas.
You can still take something of great value and worth from these quotes, even if you don’t read the dialogues. Here are 8 important and interesting quotes by Plato that we can learn from today:

“There will be no end to the troubles of states, or of humanity itself, till philosophers become kings in this world, or till those we now call kings and rulers really and truly become philosophers, and political power and philosophy thus come into the same hands.” – The Republic

 
The Republic is one of Plato’s most popular and widely taught dialogues. It discusses topics such as justice and the city-state. It heavily comments on aspects of politics within ancient Athens.
Plato is deeply critical of democracy and offers a theory of a governing body of a city-state that would be best suited to achieving the good.
Plato says that ‘philosopher kings’ should be the leaders of society. If philosophers were our leaders, then society would be just and everyone would be better off for it. This is alluding to a society where democracy isn’t the political structure of our communities.
However, the idea can be transferred to our society. If our political leaders were also philosophers, then we would have strong guidance on how to attain fulfilment in our lives (or so Plato thinks).
Plato wants a unification of philosophy and politics at the helm of political power and our governing bodies. If our leaders were those who spend their life guiding us on how to live a good life, then maybe our society and our lives would improve.

“The inexperienced in wisdom and virtue, ever occupied with feasting and such, are carried downward, and there, as is fitting, they wander their whole life long, neither ever looking upward to the truth above them nor rising toward it, nor tasting pure and lasting pleasures.” – The Republic

 
Those who don’t make an effort to learn and become wise can never achieve fulfilment or realise how to live a good life. This refers to Plato’s Theory of Forms, whereby true knowledge is in the unintelligible realm.
We must learn and educate ourselves in the material world in order to gain an understanding of these forms, and then we can attain true knowledge of the good.
This theory is complex, so we do not need to dwell on it much now. However, the ideas are transferable to our own lives.
We cannot hope to progress and move forward in our lives, mend our troubles and anxieties if we do not make a personal effort to do so.
We must learn, seek advice and strive to be virtuous if we are to live a fulfilled life and minimise the suffering that we encounter.

“On the other hand, if I say that it is the greatest good for a man to discuss virtue every day and those other things about which you hear me conversing and testing myself and others, for the unexamined life is not worth living for men, you will believe me even less.” – The Apology

 
The Apology is an account of Socrates’ defence when he was facing trial in Ancient Athens. Socrates was accused of impiety and corrupting the youth, and this dialogue allegedly recounts his own legal defence.
The famous line: “the unexamined life is not worth living” is attributed to Socrates. Indeed, it does reflect much of what Socrates appeared to believe when practising his philosophy. But we only learn of Socrates through Plato’s dialogues so we can say it reflects Plato’s philosophical thought as well.
We must examine and analyse the different aspects of our lives in order to work towards fulfilment. It is not worth living an unexamined life because you will not recognise how to change or improve your life for the better. An unexamined life can never reach a state of eudaimonia.

“Nor must one, when wronged, inflict wrong in return, as the majority believe, since one must never do wrong” – Crito

 
Socrates was sentenced to death after his trial, despite his defence. Crito is a dialogue where Socrates’ friend, Crito, offers to help Socrates escape from prison. The dialogue focuses on the subject of justice.
Crito believes that Socrates has been unjustly sentenced, but Socrates points out that escaping from prison would also be unjust.
When we are wronged, performing a wrong or immoral act will not resolve the matter, even though it may provide us with some fleeting satisfaction. There will inevitably be repercussions.
Plato echoes the popular idiom “two wrongs don’t make a right”. We must be reasonable and prudent in the face of injustice, and not act on impulse.

“For consider what good you will do yourself or your friends by breaking our agreements and committing such as wrong. It is pretty obvious that your friends will themselves be in danger of exile, disfranchisement, and loss of property.” Crito

 
The decisions we make can have an effect and repercussions on those around us. We must be wary of this.
We may feel we have been wronged, but we should be rational and restrained in these situations. Only then can you sensibly work past events that have caused you suffering, or else you may make matters worse.

“Rhetoric, it seems, is a producer of persuasion for belief, not for instruction in the matter of right and wrong … And so the rhetorician’s business is not to instruct a law court or a public meeting in matters of right and wrong, but only to make them believe.” Gorgias

 
Gorgias is dialogue that tells of a conversation between Socrates and a group of sophists. They discuss rhetoric and oratory and attempt to give definitions of what they are.
This extract says that a rhetorician (for example, a politician) or a public speaker is more concerned with persuading the audience than with what is actually true. We should use this as reference and guidance when listening to the rhetoricians of our own times.
Plato wants us to be careful of the information that we are being fed. Make an effort to educate yourself and come to your own conclusions rather than being consumed by entertaining and attractive speeches.
This feels achingly relevant considering current and recent political phenomena.

“I tell you that whoever is led by his teacher thus far in relation to love matters, and contemplates the various beautiful things in order and in the correct way, will come now towards the final goal of matters of love, and will suddenly catch sight of a beauty amazing in its nature” The Symposium

 
The Symposium tells of a conversation between several people at a dinner party as they all give their own definitions of what they think love is. They all come up with differing accounts, but Socrates’ speech appears most relevant to Plato’s own philosophical ideas.
Socrates tells of a conversation he has with the prophetess Diotima. What is explained is what is known as Plato’s Ladder of Love.
This is essentially the idea that love is a form of education and development of the self from the love of the physical to eventually the love of the form of beauty.
Love can begin as physical attraction, but the ultimate goal should be to use love to become wiser and more knowledgeable. This will allow for fulfilment and the living of a truly good life.
Love should not just be the companionship with and caring for another, but also a means of improving oneself. It can, for example, help you to deal with and understand past traumas, or encourage you to become a better person. It is a good thing if you change because of your lover.

“Knowledge is the food of the soul” – Protagoras

 
Protagoras is a dialogue concerned with the nature of sophistry – using clever but false arguments to persuade people in a discussion. Here, a strikingly succinct quote sums up Plato’s philosophy.
Knowledge is the fuel to become fulfilled individuals. Learning and striving for wisdom is the route towards living a good life. Thinking rationally about issues about our lives will allow us to deal with them better, and so will allow us to be more content with our lives.

Why these quotes by Plato are important and relevant

These Plato quotes are very relevant and helpful to our own lives and society today. We are all sensitive and troubled beings who long for contentment and happiness.
Plato dedicated his life to helping us understand how to achieve this. We must think rationally about issues in our lives and society, strive for wisdom and be willing to change in order to improve ourselves.
Only then can you hope to reach a state of eudaimonia. These Plato quotes shed light on how he believes we can do this.
These quotes are brief, and only partially represent Plato’s philosophical work as a whole. But the fact their relevance is tangible two and a half thousand years later demonstrates Plato’s lasting importance and impact on society, and our own individual lives.
References:
  1. https://www.biography.com
  2. https://www.ancient.eu
  3. Plato Complete Works, Ed. by John M. Cooper, Hackett Publishing Company
  4. Plato: Symposium, Edited and Translated by C.J. Rowe

 

 
 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2019 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

About the Author: Alexander



I am an English and Philosophy graduate and freelance writer and blogger. I have always been fascinated by art, culture and philosophy, and believe they are an integral and important part of all of our lives. My particular interests and passions include Film and ancient Greek philosophy.
 
 



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publicado por achama às 22:07
Sexta-feira, 26 / 04 / 19

Why Kant Philosophy Is Extremely Relevant to Modern Society ~ Alexander

Why Kant Philosophy Is Extremely Relevant to Modern Society.

By Alexander

https://www.learning-mind.com/

April 25th, 2019.

 
 

 

What can Kant philosophy offer to modern people? The answer is: surprisingly much.

Immanuel Kant was born in 1724 in Königsberg, Prussia. Kant philosophy thrived during theenlightenment period. This was an intellectual and philosophical movement that swept across Europe in the 18th century. A major component of this movement was the gradual decline of religious belief, hence, the growth of secularism.
Kant recognised this developing phenomenon in society and sought to remedy it. For many centuries, religion was the source of guidance and instruction for people on how to live a good and moral life. With the decline in religious belief, where would people find this guidance? Kant attempted to answer this question and concluded that people would be able to replace religion with one thing: reason.
If we use our intelligence, rationale and exercise our critical faculties, Kant thought that we are capable to determine such things like what is right and what is wrong. In an increasingly secular society in the 21stcentury, Kant philosophy is very relevant to the modern day. We can apply Kant’s ideas to many aspects of our lives, especially when considering morality.

Moral philosophy

Kant’s moral philosophy is a theory of deontological ethics. This sounds much more complex than it is. But in short, it is a theory that determines the morality of an action. It is based on whether the action being carried out is in itself moral, not based on the nature of the consequences of that action. What you do should be the way of determining a moral act, not the outcome of the act.
How do we determine whether an action is moral? Kant philosophy tells us that it is reason. Human beings are free and conscious beings who have the capability to rationalise whether or not an action is right or wrong. We all have the ability to do this. Kant believed that this would not only make you a better person but would also add value to the world.
A lot of the time, we will have to choose between duty (our responsibility to fellow man) and desire (what we want). To act dutifully, nobly and in an honourable way is how to carry out a moral act. We must resist our selfish wants in order to achieve this. But how do we determine what our duty or our responsibility is? For this, Kant gives us a principle to refer to and follow called The Categorical Imperative.

The Categorical Imperative

The Categorical Imperative is a term first coined in Kant’s work, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (1785). He summarises it in one phrase:
“Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law”
We can paraphrase this with much more recognisable and simpler terminology. Treat others as you would like to be treated, or do to others what you would want to be done to you. A similar phrase even appears in The Bible: “love thy neighbour as thyself” as well as in the Confucian Golden Rule.
It should be thought of in a wider sense as well. What would happen to society if everyone acted in the way that I am? It instructs us to detach ourselves from our own self-interests. We should approach the situation in a completely unbiased perspective – to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes.
The Categorical Imperative is a rational and decisive principle that we need to follow in order to determine what our duty is. At the same time, we should also separate ourselves from our selfish and potentially destructive desires. We can act morally and selflessly once we recognise this, improving ourselves (and society) in the process.
This code of conduct requires us to exercise our rational and critical faculties. Only then we will be able to determine between the right and wrong action. This is integral to Kant philosophy.
In Kant’s eyes, to act in a rational way is to act in a moral way. If everyone adheres to this, it would mean that we could all work towards a universal principle. This principle allows for not just the betterment of ourselves but also society as a whole.
 

Examples of Using Kant Philosophy and The Categorical Imperative

 

You are sitting for an exam.

You consider cheating, as a good grade in this exam would secure a place at university. And you think it is ok because there is a slim chance that you will get caught out.
However, how would you feel if you sat the exam in accordance with the rules and someone else cheated, dishonestly achieving a good grade and you didn’t? It would be unfair. What if everyone cheated on the exam? If this happened, people would dishonestly achieve what they don’t deserve. Thus, schools and colleges at large would become unfair and wrongful institutions.

You lie to a friend, saying you are busy because you don’t want to attend a party.

How would you feel if you found out a friend had lied to you? You would feel disheartened and betrayed. If everyone started lying to each other, then our interpersonal relationships would crumble. As a result of this, our communities and societies would become totally corrupt.

Perhaps you are walking in the street and someone just ahead of you drops some money without noticing.

You pick it up because you are short of cash. They haven’t noticed that they have dropped it and won’t know you’ve taken it. So you think little harm will be done. Yet, if you were the one to drop the cash, you would expect that if a pedestrian noticed they would have the decency to alert you and give it to you back. If everyone started taking what isn’t theirs, then society would become chaotic.
These scenarios demonstrate The Categorical Imperative in play. Thinking through the situation rationally will allow us to perform an act morally. Our reasoning, regardless of what we personally desire or want to achieve, drives our moral behaviour.
Acting on our duty to our fellow human beings and to society rather than acting on our desires would mean abiding by The Categorical Imperative. Hence, acting in a moral way.

How Kant philosophy can make you a better person

Kant philosophy is relevant today because of the secular societies that we live in. These societies are without a religious authority and so may seem as if they lack guidance for a moral code of behaviourKant provides a solution to this.
Furthermore, he makes us aware of ourselves as intelligent beings who are capable of tackling difficult questions in life, and who are capable of individually recognising how to become honest, principled and ethical people.
Kant highlights the importance of acting in accordance with reason and in a universal way. By doing this, we improve ourselves as moral individuals but also contribute to a wider aim of moral social cohesion.
References:
 
 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2019 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 

About the Author: Alexander



I am an English and Philosophy graduate and freelance writer and blogger. I have always been fascinated by art, culture and philosophy, and believe they are an integral and important part of all of our lives. My particular interests and passions include Film and ancient Greek philosophy.
 
 



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All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 

 

No religious or political belief is defended here. (Investigate yourself)

 

Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 

If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 21:13
Quarta-feira, 24 / 04 / 19

10 Marcus Aurelius Quotes That Are Still Relevant Today ~ Francesca F.

10 Marcus Aurelius Quotes That Are Still Relevant Today

By Francesca F.

April 23rd, 2019

 
 
 

Marcus Aurelius quotes may be from the time of Ancient Rome, but they are still relevant today.

Marcus Aurelius was a Roman emperor between 161 to 180. He was known as the last of the Five Good Emperors. His personal philosophical writings, now known as his Meditations, have become a source of many Marcus Aurelius quotes and are widely praised in the philosophical community. They are also commonly found to be a significant source of modern understandings of Stoic philosophy.
There are hundreds of Marcus Aurelius quotes that you can integrate into your daily life to improve it and enhance your moral understanding.

These are only ten of the best which are most definitely still relevant today and teach valuable lessons.

 

Be content to seem what you really are

 
We are always looking to emanate what others expect of us and hiding who we really are. This is one of the most famous Marcus Aurelius quotes which tells us that we must allow ourselves to be who we truly are. It reminds us to get comfortable with it and express our true selves.

The more we value things outside our control, the less control we have

One of the more insightful Marcus Aurelius quotes teaches us that when we try to control things which are not in our control, we are actually more out of control than we realise.
It is natural to feel anxious when we have little control over certain aspects of our lives. However, it is important to know what we can change and what we can’t. To gain control of our lives, we must focus on what we can control and work to improve the parts of our lives we have the power to change.

Let not your mind run on what you lack as much as on what you have already

It is natural to focus on our weaknesses. It’s easy to obsess over the things we lack and the things about ourselves we dislike the most. But it’s time to shift our focus. Look at what you do have and what you can do. Focus on the things you like most about yourself rather than the things you like the least.

If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it

One of the most inspirational Marcus Aurelius quotes to live by teaches us to do what is right and say what is true. It can be difficult to keep to our morals – we are only human after all.
Still, we should do our best to do the right things and tell the truth. It might be a challenge, but endeavouring to stay true makes us all better people.

If there is a god, all is well; and if chance rules, do not be governed by it

One of the biggest questions in life is whether or not God exists. This quote reminds us that it doesn’t necessarily matter because if God does exist, things are all as they are meant to be.
If God doesn’t exist, we cannot allow that to make life meaningless. We must find and make our own meaning in life and not let chance govern our future.

The best revenge is not to be like your enemy

Anger can drive us to do crazy things and we can often stoop to the level of our enemy rather than rising above it. The best revenge, however, is to not be like your enemy. Rising above them and being the better person will not only feel better, but others will recognise your maturity and healthier character.

Confine yourself to the present

We are all future-oriented and it is natural to strive for your goals. However, it can leave us focussing more on the future than the here and now. When we forget about the present, we forget to make time for our important relationships and the things which make us truly happy.
Confining ourselves to the present doesn’t mean forget about the future. It just reminds us to focus on the important things in our present whilst making steps towards our future.

You can commit injustice by doing nothing

It may seem that by doing nothing, we are taking ourselves out of the situation. However, this is not always the case. Being a silent witness is just as much of an injustice as committing the offence in the first place. If we do nothing with the knowledge of an injustice, we ourselves commit one.

Do every act of your life as if it were your last

When we feel demotivated or lacklustre with the task at hand, it is important to remember that we do not know just how little time we have. Commit yourself completely to everything you do and do the things that motivate you.

It is not death a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live

We cannot live our lives in fear of death because we will not make the most of the life we have. It is important to focus on what you are doing and how you are living. Do not fear death, revel in life.
Marcus Aurelius may be an ancient philosopher, but his writings continue to be relevant in today’s society. We can use his teachings in our daily lives to live better, be more moral, and revel in all life has to give.
References:
    1. https://plato.stanford.edu

 

 

 

 

About the Author: Francesca F.

Francesca is a freelance writer currently studying a degree in Law and Philosophy. She has written for several blogs in a range of subjects across Lifestyle, Relationships and Health and Fitness. Her main pursuits are learning new innovative ways of keeping fit and healthy, as well as broadening her knowledge in as many areas as possible in order to achieve success.
 
 
 
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publicado por achama às 17:59
Sábado, 13 / 04 / 19

This Alan Watts’ Approach to Meditation Is Truly Eye-Opening ~ Sofia


This Telescope Will Watch Over the Milky Way’s Supermassive Black Hole

 

 


 


If the West is now experiencing a meditation and Eastern philosophy fad rush, it has Alan Watts to thank for it.
Centuries before Alan Watts and his meditation guidelines popularized Eastern thought for western audiences, throngs of mystics and ascetics had been practicing numerous meditative paths on their way to enlightenment and self-realization.
The West was more focused on the esoteric thought that found its roots in Neo-platonic currents of thought reigning some Christian thinkers and denominations during the Middle Ages. Thus, the western world was actually late to the meditation party, until Alan Watts presented his meditation studies.
One may attribute this phenomenon to the fundamental differences between western and eastern culture and their values and perception of the world. The West relies more on material attachment and has a leaning towards individualism.
The West is also a younger civilization compared to other continents like Asia. Chinese and Indian civilizations are much older and have a larger legacy of thinkers, philosophers, and mystics.

But what is the relationshipbetween Alan Watts and meditation?

Well, let’s begin with the practice itself. What’s the real definition of meditation?

The English meditation is derived from the Old French meditacioun and the Latin meditatio. It originates from the verb meditari, meaning “to think, contemplate, devise, ponder”. The use of the term meditatio as part of a formal, stepwise process of meditation goes back to the 12th-century monk Guigo II.
Apart from its historical usage, the term meditation was a translation for Eastern spiritual practices. Texts refer to it as dhyāna in Hinduism and Buddhism. This stems from the Sanskrit root dhyai, meaning to contemplate or meditate.
The term “meditation” in English may also refer to practices from Islamic Sufism or other traditions such as the Jewish Kabbalah and Christian Hesychasm.
Aside from this purely etymological definition, however, there is no single interpretation or substantial definition on the nature of meditation.
The general popularized idea is that it is a practice of mindfulness and contemplation involving certain steps that one should follow in order to “make it work”. If “done correctly”, it can be beneficial to the training of the spirit, to attaining wisdom, internal clarity and peace, or even reaching nirvana.
There are as many ways to meditate out there as individuals; some use certain postures, chants, mantras, or prayer beads. Others can only meditate in a particular setting. Otherwise, they struggle to maintain their concentration.
Meditation can have massively beneficial effects on a person, from psychological wellness to physical health benefits. Some examples include reduced anxiety and risks of depression and other mental afflictions, to an amelioration of sleep patterns, to a general sense of wellness.
But is that the point of it? Does it even have a point? Should it have a point?
This is where Alan Watts comes in, declaring this particular notion of meditation as hubris.

Alan Watts on meditation

Born on the 9th of January 1915 in Chislehurst, England, Alan Watts spent most of his early childhood in boarding schools. This is where he received a Christian catechism he later described as “grim and maudlin”.
He went on to move to America, entrenching himself in religious studies, philosophy, theology and Buddhist thought. Thus, it was the start of the tremendous legacy he left behind.
The true beginning of that legacy was his 1957 seminal work, “The Way of Zen”, introducing the idea of Zen Buddhism to millions in the West. His book appealed massively to the younger generations. They would later go on to form the bulk of the 60’s “flower-power’ counter-culture.

Regarding Alan Watts’ views on meditation, one might best illustrate it using one of his most well-known quotes:

“You will feel like an onion: skin after skin, subterfuge after subterfuge, is pulled off to find no kernel at the center. Which is the whole point: to find out that the ego is indeed a fake -a wall of defense around a wall of defense […] around nothing. You can’t even want to get rid of it, nor yet want to want to. Understanding this, you will see that the ego is exactly what it pretends it isn’t”.
When it comes to meditation, Alan Watts does not support the concept of meditation as a task or a practice that one “does”. To meditate in order to attain a purpose defeats the purpose of meditating, which is that… it has no particular purpose, and it ought not to have one.
For, if one hypothesizes that to meditate is to let go of earthly concerns and be able to let themselves reenter the flow of creation and energy they are part of, then to look to the future instead of submerging in the moment, in being, nullifies the practice.
Meditation, for Alan Watts, does not have to follow the stereotype of the reclusive yogi who simply sits still under some waterfall. One can meditate while making coffee, or walking to buy the morning paper. His point is best illustrated in this video regarding guided meditation:

Here’s the summary of Alan Watts’ approach to meditation, as per the video:

One only has to listen.

Not hear, not categorize, but listen. Let the sounds happen around you. Once you close your eyes, your ears will become more sensitive. You will be flooded by the minuscule sounds of everyday commotion.
At first, you will want to put a name on them. But as time goes on and the sounds ebb and flow, they stop having an individuality.
They are part of a flow that happens whether “you” are there to experience it or not. Same with your breath. You never make a conscious effort to breathe. Only when you begin to focus on it does it preoccupy you. They also happen as part of your being, as part of your nature.
Which brings us to the thoughts. The key secret to meditation, as Alan Watts kindly mapped out, is to let one’s thoughts flow as natural parts of their existence.
You could compare this to the flow of a river. One does not try to stop the river and put it through a sieve. One simply lets the river flow, and we must do the same with our thoughts.
Thoughts are not bigger or smaller, important or unimportant; they simply are, and so are you. And without even realizing it, you exist and operate within a fabric that we can perceive but never see.
This approach to meditation can help you finally live in the present moment as the whole of creation develops. And just like that, every moment is part of the mosaic of moments we inherently belong in.

Everything flows and exists, with no subjective value. And that realization in itself is liberating.

References:
  1. https://bigthink.com
  2. Image by Alan Watts Foundation – http://www.alanwatts.orgCC BY-SA 4.0


 
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publicado por achama às 06:26
Quinta-feira, 24 / 01 / 19

10 Questions That Make You Think about a Deeper Meaning of Life ~ Francesca F.

10 Questions That Make You Think about a Deeper Meaning of Life.

By Francesca F.

January 19th, 2019

 
questions that make you think.

 

 

The meaning of life is one of those questions that make you think.  It is one we all ask ourselves, but one which encompasses so many other questions.

Finding the meaning of life can be almost impossible. It depends on who you are, how old you are, and what is truly important to you. We each value different things at different times, but there are a number of questions that make you think about the little intricacies of life.
Life is so much more than can be boiled down to one question, so here are ten questions that make you think about life as a sum of its parts.
  1. What is more important, progression or preservation?
The human race is pushing for more innovation and the next big invention, but we are doing so at the cost of the world we live in. The environment is suffering at the hands of our progression.
In 2016, half of the Great Barrier Reef was announced be dead due to bleaching. Microplastics have been found within the human digestive system. With so many environmental concerns emerging, it makes you wonder whether the progression of technology is coming at the cost of the preservation of the world we live in and even our own health.

2.Are we getting smarter or lazier?

Technology is one of human kind’s crowning achievements. Technology is deeply integrated into our daily lives and makes life so much easier. It is true that we are able to do so much more with technology than we have in the past, but it may be making us lazy.
With more technology comes less need to think. We can ask our smartphones the answer to any question and we no longer have to do the work ourselves. It can make us lazy, finding shortcuts where possible and reducing our attention span when the internet can’t answer the question for us.

3.Why don’t we have a global language?

Communication is one of the most important skills people enjoy. It is curious, then, that we haven’t evolved some kind of global language spoken by all to enable communication to thrive. The importance of culture and heritage has stunted global integration and highlight the importance of who we are as people.

4.Why do we let money ruin lives when it is something we ourselves created?

One of the most important questions that make you think about the meaning of life is the meaning of money. Money controls literally every aspect of our lives, even though humans created it.
We allow it to ruin the lives of those in poverty and give control to those with more. We allow it to grant status and judge those with less than us.  Philosophically speaking, the conundrum of money as something created by humans but the maker of misery for many of us is troubling.

5.Can we truly have faith in something we can’t prove?

Religion is a curious thing to many. For those who don’t believe, it can be confusing how one can have faith in something we cannot see.
Religion is not the only thing we believe in which we cannot see. We believe in time, probability, and some believe in aliens. We cannot prove that these things exist even though some phenomena are observable, but trust that these things exist even though the things themselves cannot be seen.
It is curious that we have such blind faith in scientific things we cannot see and yet judge others for faith in religion.

6.If fear didn’t exist, what would you do?

Fear is something that holds us all back. Fear of being hurt, fear of rejection, fear of failure. If fear didn’t exist, what would you do? What would you strive for? What would you try to achieve?

7.Are we born who we are or do we become who we are through experience?

The old nature versus nurture debate questions how we become the people we are today. How much of us is made up of genetics and what do we learn as we grow up?
It makes you wonder how much of life is within our control or whether a certain amount of destiny is involved with our future selves.

8.Why do we value some lives more than others?

We tend to care and sympathize with those who suffer close to us rather than those who suffer at a distance. We allow oceans and vast distances to remove us from the suffering of others, even though we are aware that it’s happening.
It seems to make us value the lives of some more than others rather than striving for equality for all.

9.Can time move at different paces?

We all know the phrase time flies when you’re having fun, but is it true? When we’re bored we notice time move slower and when we are enjoying ourselves it seems to speed up.
Although the construct of time never changes its pace, our experience of it does. It makes you realize that we must make the most of the time that we have.

10.Is love truly the answer?

Love is the subject of hundreds of love songs, poetry, and art, but is it really the answer, and, if it is, what is it the answer to? We can find happiness in achievements and in our own personal lives, but do we need love to feel complete?
Questions that make you think about the meaning of life don’t necessarily have an answer but can make you think about the most important aspects of life.  These ten questions may help you realize what is truly important.
 

About the Author: Francesca F.

Francesca is a freelance writer currently studying a degree in Law and Philosophy. She has written for several blogs in a range of subjects across Lifestyle, Relationships and Health and Fitness. Her main pursuits are learning new innovative ways of keeping fit and healthy, as well as broadening her knowledge in as many areas as possible in order to achieve success.
 
 
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 



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If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 02:32
A Luz está a revelar a Verdade, e esta libertar-nos-á! -Só é real o AMOR Incondicional. -Quando o Amor superar o amor pelo poder, o mundo conhecerá a Paz; Jimi Hendrix. -Somos almas a ter uma experiência humana!

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