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Sexta-feira, 21 / 06 / 19

14 Origins of Phrases You Probably Use Every Day but Had No Idea about ~ Janey Davies.

14 Origins of Phrases You Probably Use Every Day but Had No Idea about.

By Janey Davies.

June 21st, 2019.

 
 

 



 

Have you ever walked into a tiny room and thought ‘I couldn’t swing a cat in here?’ Have you ever ‘rubbed someone up the wrong way?’ These are examples of phrases we use all the time, but do you know their origins?
I love words. I love metaphors, words that come from foreign languages, I love how words shape our minds, how we use them to influence people, they’re just so powerful.
Lately, I’ve been looking into the origins of phrases and have found some really interesting ones I thought I’d share with you. I hope you find them as fascinating as I did.

14 Little-Known Origins of Popular Phrases

Not enough room to swing a cat

 
1. A very small space
This is a nautical term and derives from a ‘cat-o-nine-tails’, a whip used to punish sailors onboard ships. Sailors would usually receive punishment below decks. However, quarters were cramped, hence the saying, ‘no room to swing the cat‘.

Rubbing someone up the wrong way

 
2. To irritate or annoy
In America in the 16-century, slaves had many tasks to carry out. One was to rub the wooden floors of their master’s houses, first with a wet cloth, then with a dry one. If they went against the natural grain, it looked unsightly and annoyed the master.

Lost your bottle

 
3. Cowardly behaviour
You’ll never guess where this phrase originates from. It comes from bare-knuckle fighters in the 20-century and their bottle men.
Each fighter had their own bottle man to provide them with water between rounds.  Managers with poor fighters would instruct the bottle man to disappear. This would stop the fight. ‘Lost your bottle man’ was eventually shortened to ‘lost your bottle’.

Let your hair down

 
4. To relax
In Parisian society, it was the done thing to have an elaborate hair-do. These hairdos took hours to achieve so at the end of the evening it was a huge relief to let them down.

Take the upper hand

 
5. To gain an advantage
This phrase originates from the 15-century and comes from a game involving two or more people and a long stick. The first person places their hand on the stick at the bottom, the next person places their hand just above and so on until the last person to reach the top of the stick wins. They have the upper hand.

Rule of thumb

 
6. A broad principle
In the 17-century, an English judge ruled that British men could legally beat their wives with a stick, so long as the stick was less than the width of the husband’s thumb.

Blackmail

 
7. To demand money by threats
This is one of those phrases you’d never guess the origins unless perhaps you are Scottish. It originated in the Scottish Highlands in the 16-century.
In those days, ‘mail’ was an old word which meant rent. Farmers paid rent in silver coins. The rent was known as ‘white mail’. Certain clans started racketeering in the farming areas. They threatened farmers with violence then offered them protection but only if they paid. Farmers called this extra payment ‘black-mail’.

Saved by the bell

 
8. Rescue from an unwanted situation
Before advances in modern medicine and technology, it was quite common for doctors to pronounce people dead. The problem was, these people were not dead and some were being buried alive.
Fear spread amongst towns and cities. Stories passed around of gravediggers hearing screams from below the ground at night. To combat the problem, a special coffin was made with a bell that could be rung from inside that would alert people above ground. Hence, ‘saved by the bell‘.

You’re fired!

 
9. Given the sack
No, this phrase does not have its origins in the Whitehouse or anywhere near Donald Trump. It’s much older than that. It’s a mining term.
A miner caught stealing would have his tools burned or ‘fired’. It meant he couldn’t work anywhere. It was so effective a punishment that other trades adopted the phrase.

Get the sack

 
10. Lose your job
Speaking of getting the sack, that’s another one of our phrases that has unusual origins. Today, getting the sack has unpleasant connotations, but in actual fact, in the past, it was a positive sign.
Centuries ago, craftsmen and labourers would expect to work on a job for a few days or a week at most. They would carry their tools in a sack, which the owner would stash for them for safekeeping. The sacks were returned when the labourer finished the job. They got their sack back.

Spill the beans

11. To reveal a secret
This is another one of those phrases that you’ll never guess its origins in a million years. In ancient Greece, people voted in elections using beans. If they liked a candidate, they used a white bean. If they disapproved, they would place a black bean in the container.
If these containers were knocked over, everyone could see how the voting was going. Therefore, if someone ‘spilled the beans‘, the secret was out.

Kicking the bucket

 
12. Dying
You might not use this phrase after you learn of its origins. In slaughterhouses, when cows are killed, a bucket is placed underneath it to catch the blood when it dies. Sometimes, the cow’s legs would kick the bucket when it died.

Let the cat out of the bag

13. Reveal a secret
Back in medieval times, the marketplace was rife with tricksters and fraudsters. One such deception was the sale of suckling pigs. Once the pig was purchased, the hapless buyer would be distracted by the seller.
The pig would then be swapped for a cat and which was placed in the bag, ready for the customer. The customer would only realise when he ‘let the cat out of the bag’.

Cold Feet

 
14. Lose your nerve
German writer Fritz Reuter was the first person to use this phrase. Interestingly, Reuter uses the term in each of his books.
In the first, ‘An Old Story of My Farming Days’, he uses it to describe a poker player to wants to leave the game with his winnings intact. The poker player complains he has ‘cold feet’ and manages to leave without causing upset to the other players.  In the other, ‘Seed-time and Harvest’, it involves a joke made by a shoemaker.
Do you have any interesting phrases or words you’d like to share? Even better, do you know their origins? Let us know!
 
References:
  1. https://www.buzzfeed.com
  2. https://list25.com

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

About the Author: Janey Davies.

Janey Davies has been published online for over 8 years. She is the head writer for Shoppersbase.com, she also writes for AvecAgnes.co.uk, Ewawigs.com and has contributed to inside3DP.com. She has an Honours Degree in Psychology and her passions include learning about the mind, popular science and politics. When she is relaxing she likes to walk her dog, read science fiction and listen to Muse.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 
 
 



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publicado por achama às 19:31
Quarta-feira, 22 / 05 / 19

13 Commonly Misused Words That May Belie Your Intelligence ~ Janey Davies

13 Commonly Misused Words That May Belie Your Intelligence.

By Janey Davies.

May 20th, 2019.

 

 



 

Our language is a wonderful tool. We use it to communicate our innermost thoughts and feelings. Writers in particular love to seek out words that add nuance and layers to their work. But in doing so, they can sometimes pick commonly misused words.
It can be tempting to pop that unusual word into your blog or article and in the context, it might look right. But get it wrong and to someone who knows what means it will jump off the page and slap them in the face.
More to the point, it won’t make you look like the talented wordsmith you were hoping it would. In fact, it will do the exact opposite. That one misused word will ruin everything else you’ve written.
It will also stain your reputation. That reader is unlikely to visit any other articles or blogs you write in the future. And all because of some commonly misused words.
The problem is, and I include myself in this group, writers are not good with others critiquing their work. That’s why I always use spellcheck and a grammar check before I upload anything to the internet. I also have an editor with eyes like a hawk who can spot a comma out of place from a mile off.
But let’s get back to those words that commonly get misused. What kinds are we talking about? Here are 13 examples:

13 Commonly Misused Words

Accept or Except

These words sound almost the same but are different. You can accept something: “She accepted his proposal of marriage.” Except is to exclude: “I like every cake except lemon drizzle.”

Affect or Effect

Affect is to influence: “His speech really affected me.” Effect means to put into effect: “The village effected changes after a vote.”

Compliment or Complement

compliment as an expression of admiration: “I got a big compliment about my new hairstyle today.” Complement completes or makes up a whole: “The cologne he wore was an ideal complement to his outfit.”

Comprise or Compose

Comprise is to include, compose means to make up, but both are to do with parts and the whole. When you use comprise, you put the whole first: “The United States of America comprisesof fifty states.”  When you use the parts first, you use compose: “Fifty states compose the United States of America.”

Disinterested or Uninterested

Disinterested does not mean uninterested. It means unbiased or impartial: “The disinterestedmediator chaired our discussions.” Uninterested is indifferent or not interested: “They were uninterested in talking to us.”

Enormity or Enormous

Enormity does not mean enormous. Enormity means extreme evil: “The enormity of the psychopath’s crimes would never be forgotten.” Enormous means extremely large: “She had an enormous amount of homework to do.”

Farther or Further

Farther means a physical distance travelled: “I have much farther to go.” Further refers to the extent of an action or situation: “We must speak further on this topic.”

Fewer or Less

This is a nice easy one to remember; use fewer when you are writing about individual items that you can count and less when referring to a whole: “She had fewer clothes which meant there was less in her wardrobe.”

Flaunt or Flout

Flaunt means to show off: “She flaunted her figure.” Flout means to disobey: “She flouted the rules.”

i.e. / e.g.

I often have to think which abbreviation is appropriate to use when I’m writing. Here are the rules:
Use e.g. when you want to show examples: “She had worked for several notable charity organisations (e.g., The Red Cross, Oxfam, Greenpeace).”
Use i.e. when you want to say in other words: “I had a lovely day out with my grandchildren (i.e.,spending all day at the park and getting thoroughly tired out!)”
An easy way to remember which is the correct one to use is that e.g. starts with ‘e for example’ and i.e. starts with ‘i for in other words’.

Imply or Infer

To imply is to suggest without actually saying it outright. “He implied he knew where the treasure was buried.”
To infer is to draw a conclusion from what was implied. “She inferred from what he implied that he knew where the treasure was buried.” Generally, the speaker implies and the listener infers.

Staunch or Stanch

Staunch does not mean to stop a flow. Staunch means loyal, faithful, or constant: “Her staunchsupporters where by her side when she won the election.”
Stanch means to stop the flow of something: “The increased police presence on the streets stopped the stanch of the recent crime wave.”

Who’s or Whose

I always struggle with this one. Remember, who’s is contracted from who is: Who’s going to help me with this difficult job?” Whose is the possessive form of who. So, as the following are:
  • I – Me/Mine
  • You – Your/Yours
  • She – Her/Hers
  • He – His
  • They – Their/Theirs
  • Us – Our/Ours
  • Who – Whose
An example of whose: Whose job is it to help me with this difficult task?” 
There are many more examples of commonly misused words that can belie our intelligence. Which ones do you struggle with? Let us know in the comments section below!
 
References:
  1. https://www.independent.co.uk
  2. https://www.linkedin.com

 

 

 

About the Author: Janey Davies.

Janey Davies has been published online for over 8 years. She is the head writer for Shoppersbase.com, she also writes for AvecAgnes.co.uk, Ewawigs.com and has contributed to inside3DP.com. She has an Honours Degree in Psychology and her passions include learning about the mind, popular science and politics. When she is relaxing she likes to walk her dog, read science fiction and listen to Muse.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 
 
 



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No religious or political belief is defended here. (Investigate yourself)

 

Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 

If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 23:49
Domingo, 12 / 05 / 19

23 Weird Words That Have Different Meanings to Those You Imagine ~ Janey Davies.

8 CBT Techniques for Anxiety That Will Calm Your Anxious Mind.

By Janey Davies.

May 11th, 2019.

 
 
 
 
 

 


 

Our language is full of weird words that look as if they mean one thing but actually imply something completely different.

 
For example, take the word bucolic. If you didn’t already know what this word meant, you might surmise that it was a medical word connected to an illness of the lungs perhaps. In actual fact, bucolic means rural or countryside and it used to portray a lush, green and pleasant rural setting. Not something that immediately springs to mind when you first read the word. This is just one example of weird words and how they can throw you off balance in delightful ways.
Here are 23 weird words that mean something different to what you might imagine:
 
Abditive
 
You might think I’ve forgotten to put my spellcheck on, but I assure you this is an actual word. The meaning of abditive is to have the power of hiding away or tending to conceal from others.
 
 
Cabotage
 
This has nothing to do with sabotaging cabbages. It is a nautical term that refers to the transportation of passengers and goods within the same country.
 
Callipygian
 
This is a word you might get confused with calligraphy and therefore think it has something to do with handwriting. However, it derives from Greek words kallipūgos, to describe a famous statue of Venus, and pūgē, which mean “buttocks.” It means to have shapely buttocks.
 
Crepuscular
 
You wouldn’t want to have a severe case of the crepuscular, would you? This word sounds like some disgusting skin disease that requires a strong dose of antibiotics. It actually means animals or being active at twilight. It comes from Latin crepusculum, meaning “twilight.”
 
Dinomania
 
Dinomania has nothing to do with dinosaurs, it means to have a passion for dancing.
 
Eclipsis
 
Have you ever seen an eclipsis? One might think it has a connection with the sun and moonand the natural phenomena of eclipses, but it doesn’t. Eclipsis are omissions of words or sounds in speech.
 
Encomiast
 
This word is nothing to do with the economy. In fact, it means a person who praises or delivers a eulogy.
 
Foison
 
The word foison looks so much like poison that surely, it must have a similar meaning, right? The truth could not be further. Foison means plenty or a plentiful yield.
 
Formication
 
Steady on! This isn’t what you think! Formication is very similar to fornication but the start of the word might give you a little clue.
 
 
The Latin word for ants is ‘Formica Farris’ and formication means the sensation of ants crawling over your body. It comes from the Latin word formīcāre, which means “to crawl like ants.”
 
Gravid
 
This is one of the weird words that looks like it means stern or serious. Actually, it is a medical word for pregnant.
 
Illutation
 
Illutation looks like a misspelling of the word illustration. It sounds like it could have something to do with diction or dialect, but its meaning is far more basic. It means to smear the body with mud or to take a mud bath.
 
Impignorate
 
You’d be forgiven for thinking this word had similarities with an ignorant person or a lack of intelligence. Actually, it’s a verb that means to pawn or mortgage something.
 
Jentacular
 
Unless you know this word, it’s virtually impossible to guess its meaning. Jentacular means eating breakfast as soon as you get up. It’s from Latin ientaculum (“a breakfast taken immediately on getting up“).
 
 
Lamprophony
 
Wasn’t there a king that died of a surfeit of lampreys? Perhaps this is a word that describes his fate? I’m wrong again. This word means to speak clearly and loudly.
 
Macrosmatic
 
Don’t managers micro-manage stuff so perhaps this word is something to do with that? I’m not even close. Macrosmatic means having a good sense of smell.
 
Nocent
 
This word looks so much like innocent that you’d think it should mean the same thing, but it is the opposite. Nocent means guilty or tending to do harm.
 
Noisome
 
Don’t use this word to depict noise, you’ll end up looking less clever than you want people to think!
 
Noisome comes from an old English word ‘noy’ to annoy and means disagreeable or offensive. This can be in several ways including smelly.
 
Nudiustertian
 
Any ideas about this word? The beginning sounds like it could have some connections to people who like lounging about on nudist beaches. But no, this is a fabulously weird word that means ‘the day before yesterday’.
 
Nugatory
 
Personally, I love nougat and would imagine that this word describes the tasty confectionary in some manner. Of course, this is an article about weird words, so it has nothing to do with candy. It means of no value or importance. It comes from the Latin word nugari “to trifle.”
 
Obstriction
 
Obstriction sounds like obstruction so the chances are they have similar meanings. However, obstriction is a word to denote an obligation or a duty.
 
Pulchritude
 
This word sounds like a type of fungus you would expect growing at the foot of a tree, but it is a particularly ugly word to describe exquisite beauty, especially of a woman.
 
Roscid
 
This is another one of those weird words that could be mistaken for a similar-sounding word like rancid and therefore put you on the wrong track. But roscid means moist or dewy.
 
Sinister
 
We all know that this word means evil or to have harmful intentions, but its true meaning from heraldry is ‘towards the left-hand side’ on a coat of arms.
 
Do you have any weird words you’d like to share? Let us know!
 
References:

 

About the Author: Janey Davies.

Janey Davies has been published online for over 8 years. She is the head writer for Shoppersbase.com, she also writes for AvecAgnes.co.uk, Ewawigs.com and has contributed to inside3DP.com. She has an Honours Degree in Psychology and her passions include learning about the mind, popular science and politics. When she is relaxing she likes to walk her dog, read science fiction and listen to Muse.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 
 
 



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If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


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publicado por achama às 05:19
Domingo, 05 / 05 / 19

27 Foreign Words You Didn’t Know You Were Using Every Day ~ Janey Davies.

18 Famous People with INFJ Personality Traits.

By Janey Davies.

May 5th, 2019.

 
 
 
 
 

 


 

Some words are so intrinsically embedded into our unconscious that we don’t even realise they are foreign words.

Take the internationally-known distress call of ‘May Day!’ for example. It derives from the French verb for help – ‘aider’.
In the 1920s, people were getting used to new international radio communications. A senior air traffic control officer was asked to come up with a word that was easy to pronounce and remember to signify an emergency. He thought of ‘Mayday’ which comes from the French meaning ‘help me’ or ‘m’aidez’.
Mayday is just one of many foreign words we use without realising their origins.

Here are 27 other foreign words you didn’t know you were using every day:

FRENCH

Curfew
Curfew comes from the French word ‘couvrefeu’ which means to cover fire. It originates from a 13th-century European law. At a certain time, a bell would ring and all fires had to be extinguished or covered.
Denim
I’ve always associated denim with America but the origins of the word denim originate in France. A hard-wearing blue twill cloth was originally made in a small French town called Nîmes in the 17th-century. The word denim is a contraction of ‘serge de Nîmes’ (a sturdy cloth from Nîmes).
Mortgage
Have you ever signed a mortgage? Then I hate to tell you that you’ve signed a death pledge. ‘Mort’ means death in French and the whole word describes the promise (or pledge) you have agreed to pay back borrowed money in the future.
Prairie
You wouldn’t think this word could make it onto a list of foreign words as it sounds like it is from America’s Midwest. However, it is a French word for meadow.
Portrait
This foreign word comes from the French word ‘portraire’, or to portray, particularly the face.

SPANISH

Alligator
Surely an alligator is just an alligator? No one invented a word for it? In actual fact, they did. The word comes from the Spanish ‘el lagarto’, or lizard.
Canyon
This is another word we associate with the US but has its origins in Spain. It comes from the Spanish word ‘cañón’ which means tube. It was used by 19th-century Americans who were exploring Spanish territory in the west.
Cigar
The Spanish call the dried tobacco leaves rolled in a tobacco leaf a ‘cigarro’ which actually originates from a Mayan word ‘sicar’.
Mosquito
The name of this annoying biting parasite means ‘little fly’ in Spanish.
Guerrilla
The word guerrilla is full of connotations around the world. However, it is a Spanish word that means ‘little war’.

ITALIAN

Corridor
Corridor derives from the Italian word ‘corridoio’ which means hallway or passageway.
Confetti
This foreign word comes from Italy and the custom of throwing candy (confetto) on festive occasions.
Graffiti
This word comes from the plural of ‘graffito’ which means ‘scratched’.
Mascara
You’ll never wear mascara in the same way again after you realise its origins. The word mascara comes from the Italian verb ‘maschera’ which is ‘to disguise’.

SWEDISH

Moped
The moped is a contraction of ‘motor’ and ‘pedaler’ and comes from Sweden.

DUTCH

Cookie
Cookies are practically synonymous with the US but did you know their origins are firmly in Europe? The word cookie is derived from the Dutch word ‘koekie’ which means ‘little cake’ or ‘like a little cake’.
Sketch
Sketch is another Dutch word that comes from ‘schets’ or ‘to make a rough drawing’.

GREEK

Anonymous
Anonymous is from the Greek word ‘anōnumos’ and means someone or something without a name.

GERMAN

Noodle
Most of us think of noodles and Eastern countries such as China or Japan, but the word originated a lot closer to home. As a matter of fact, the word comes from the German ‘nudel’which translated means a long, thin strip of dough.
Rucksack
This is another one of those words you wouldn’t think has foreign origins, but it comes from Germany. In German, ‘rücken’ means ‘back’ and sack means bag. Hence a sack worn on the back.

JAPANESE

Tsunami
Unfortunately, we have all heard of tsunamis and we can even pronounce them properly now. We understand them to be those huge destructive waves you get in extreme weather conditions. But in Japanese, they simply mean ‘harbour wave’.

CHINESE

Ketchup
How can this be one of our foreign words? But it’s true, this common western condiment originated in China. It was first called ‘Ke-stiap’ and was a blend of pickled fish and spices. Then tomatoes were added and it became ketchup.
Kowtow
Have you ever had to kowtow to someone? We know it means to act in a subservient way, but the actual meaning comes from ‘Kòu tóu’ which is a respectful bow that involves touching your head to the floor.
Gung-ho
The English and Chinese have very different meanings attached to this word. English translate gung-ho as an ‘overzealous attitude’, but in China, it means ‘to work together’.

MEXICAN

Chocolate
Chocolate arrived in the English language after travelling through Spanish but it originated in Mexico as ‘xocolatl’.

ARABIC

Lemon
The humble lemon is a word derived from the Arabic for yellow citrus fruit which is ‘laimun’. It caught on and now lemon is synonymous with the colour as much as it is with the fruit.
Sofa
My final foreign word is sofa. Sofa is surely an English word? But no. Described as a ‘long seat full of cushions’, it comes from the Arabic word ‘uffa’.
What foreign words do you know that are now part of our English language? Let us know in the comments box!
References:
  1. http://mentalfloss.com
  2. http://www.ruf.rice.edu
  3. https://www.academia.edu

 

About the Author: Janey Davies.

Janey Davies has been published online for over 8 years. She is the head writer for Shoppersbase.com, she also writes for AvecAgnes.co.uk, Ewawigs.com and has contributed to inside3DP.com. She has an Honours Degree in Psychology and her passions include learning about the mind, popular science and politics. When she is relaxing she likes to walk her dog, read science fiction and listen to Muse.
 
COPYRIGHT © 2018 LEARNING MIND. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. FOR PERMISSION TO REPRINT, CONTACT US.
 
 
 



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Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.

 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 

 

No religious or political belief is defended here. (Investigate yourself)

 

Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 

If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 


More @ http://violetflame.biz.ly and 
https://rayviolet.blogspot.com/




 

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publicado por achama às 23:20
A Luz está a revelar a Verdade, e esta libertar-nos-á! -Só é real o AMOR Incondicional. -Quando o Amor superar o amor pelo poder, o mundo conhecerá a Paz; Jimi Hendrix. -Somos almas a ter uma experiência humana!

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